Special Characters - The Alt Key Entry Method

The chart below lists many "special characters" supported by DBT. Although superseded by more convenient methods on most Windows systems, the "Alt-key" method for entering characters that do not appear on the keyboard can still occasionally be useful. In the list below, find your character, note the number next to "DOS:" (if available) or "Win:" and follow these directions.

Turn on the Num Lock (a key on the numeric keypad on full keyboards). Hold down the Alt key (you might be required to use the left Alt key) and enter a 3 or 4 digit decimal number on the Numeric keypad. Then release the Alt key.

If the number does not start with zero, it is accepted as the character in the old MS-DOS code page, also known as code page 437.

If the number starts with zero, it is accepted as the character in the current Windows 8-bit code page. For the chart below, we assume the use of code page 1252 (the most common).

For example, using the chart below you can enter the Euro symbol by keying Alt + 0128.

(See also the notes below this chart.)

Char

DUSCI

DOS

Windows-1252

Character Description

D+80

DOS:128

Win:0199

Latin capital letter c with cedilla

D+81

DOS:129

Win:0252

Latin small letter u with diaeresis

D+82

DOS:130

Win:0233

Latin small letter e with acute

D+83

DOS:131

Win:0226

Latin small letter a with circumflex

D+84

DOS:132

Win:0228

Latin small letter a with diaeresis

D+85

DOS:133

Win:0224

Latin small letter a with grave

D+86

DOS:134

Win:0229

Latin small letter a with ring above

D+87

DOS:135

Win:0231

Latin small letter c with cedilla

D+88

DOS:136

Win:0234

Latin small letter e with circumflex

D+89

DOS:137

Win:0235

Latin small letter e with diaeresis

D+8a

DOS:138

Win:0232

Latin small letter e with grave

D+8b

DOS:139

Win:0239

Latin small letter i with diaeresis

D+8c

DOS:140

Win:0238

Latin small letter i with circumflex

D+8d

DOS:141

Win:0236

Latin small letter i with grave

D+8e

DOS:142

Win:0196

Latin capital letter a with diaeresis

D+8f

DOS:143

Win:0197

Latin capital letter a with ring above

D+90

DOS:144

Win:0201

Latin capital letter e with acute

D+93

DOS:147

Win:0244

Latin small letter o with circumflex

D+94

DOS:148

Win:0246

Latin small letter o with diaeresis

D+95

DOS:149

Win:0242

Latin small letter o with grave

D+96

DOS:150

Win:0251

Latin small letter u with circumflex

D+97

DOS:151

Win:0249

Latin small letter u with grave

D+98

DOS:152

Win:0255

Latin small letter y with diaeresis

D+99

DOS:153

Win:0214

Latin capital letter o with diaeresis

D+9a

DOS:154

Win:0220

Latin capital letter u with diaeresis

D+ed5c

xx

Win:0128

Euro sign

D+9b

DOS:155

Win:0162

Cent sign

D+9d

DOS:157

Win:0165

Yen sign

D+a0

DOS:160

Win:0225

Latin small letter a with acute

D+a1

DOS:161

Win:0237

Latin small letter i with acute

D+a2

DOS:162

Win:0243

Latin small letter o with acute

D+a3

DOS:163

Win:0250

Latin small letter u with acute

D+a4

DOS:164

Win:0241

Latin small letter n with tilde

D+a5

DOS:165

Win:0209

Latin capital letter n with tilde

D+a8

DOS:168

Win:0191

Inverted question mark

D+ad

DOS:173

Win:0161

Inverted exclamation mark

D+f6

DOS:246

Win:0247

Division sign {line between two dots}

D+f7

DOS:247

Win:0215

"Multiplication sign
{X shape, i.e. cross or ""times""}"

D+f8

DOS:248

Win:0176

Degree sign

D+f9

DOS:249

Win:0183

Middle dot

D+9c83

xx

Win:0194

Latin capital letter a with circumflex
{capital

D+9c85

xx

Win:0192

Latin capital letter a with grave {capital }

D+9c88

xx

Win:0202

Latin capital letter e with circumflex {capital

D+9c89

xx

Win:0203

Latin capital letter e with diaeresis {capital

D+9c8a

xx

Win:0200

Latin capital letter e with grave {capital }

D+9c8b

xx

Win:0207

Latin capital letter i with diaeresis {capital

D+9c8c

xx

Win:0206

Latin capital letter i with circumflex {capital

D+9c8d

xx

xx

Latin capital letter i with grave {capital }

D+9c93

xx

Win:0212

Latin capital letter o with circumflex {capital

D+9c95

xx

Win:0210

Latin capital letter o with grave {capital }

D+9c96

xx

Win:0219

Latin capital letter u with circumflex {capital

D+9c97

xx

Win:0217

Latin capital letter u with grave {capital }

D+9ca0

xx

Win:0193

Latin capital letter a with acute {capital }

D+9ca1

xx

Win:0205

Latin capital letter i with acute {capital }

D+9ca2

xx

Win:0211

Latin capital letter o with acute {capital }

D+9ca3

xx

Win:0218

Latin capital letter u with acute {capital }

D+f523

DOS:156

Win:0163

Pound sign {British pound sterling}

D+f527

xx

Win:0167

Section sign {Section mark}

D+f531

xx

Win:0177

Plus-minus sign {plus or minus}

D+f536

xx

Win:0182

Pilcrow sign {paragraph mark}

D+f543

xx

Win:0195

Latin capital letter a with tilde

D+f555

xx

Win:0213

Latin capital letter o with tilde

D+f563

xx

Win:0227

Latin small letter a with tilde

D+f575

xx

Win:0245

Latin small letter o with tilde

Notes

1. This chart applies for DBT, MS Word, WordPad, and Notepad. It may not work for some other text editing programs.

2. You can also input a "special character" in DBT by using its DUSCI code. Once you look up the DUSCI code for your character in the chart, do this. Hold down the Alt key and press F9. In the dialog box which appears, type in the numbers and letters that follow the "D+" in the chart. (You can also open the DUSCI input dialog using control and right bracket: Ctrl + ].)

3. You may have noted the chart above contains no code values higher than 255. Using this method in Word and in WordPad (but not in DBT), you can enter a number higher than 255, and the number will be interpreted as a Unicode character.

4. Be aware that most other Unicode charts and Code Page charts use hexadecimal notation. For the Alt-key entry method, you need to enter a decimal number on the computer keypad. If you look up a character on another chart, you may need to convert the hexadecimal number to decimal. For example, to enter a Euro symbol (hexadecimal 20AC) in MS Word or WordPad, you can use Alt + 8364 which is the decimal equivalent. Incidentally, hex numbers are often prefixed with "0x" to indicate hexadecimal notation, like this: 0x20AC. The calculator accessory on your computer can probably do hex to decimal conversion for you, in the "programmer" mode. If not, you can find a converter on the Web.

5. If your document is not using the Windows-1252 code page, you can still look up the DOS value for most of these characters. Duxbury can expand this chart if given good input from our users regarding which other code pages are most helpful.